I AM LIFE

INTERNATIONAL AMYLOIDOSIS MYELOMA AND LYMPHOMA FOUNDATION

 

 

Myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells, which starts in bone marrow. Plasma cells are a type of white blood cells and are part of the body's immune systems. Normal plasma cells make antibodies, which help fight infections, but myeloma cells cannot. As the myeloma cells grow in the bone marrow they crowd out the normal plasma cells. They also crowd out normal white cells, red cells and platelets.  About 19,900 Americans will be diagnosed with myeloma this year. About 60,424 people in the U.S. are living with myeloma. Most people with myeloma are age 50 and older. Americans of African descent are diagnosed with myeloma about twice as often as Americans of European descent. People of Asian and Hispanic descent have lower rates of myeloma than other groups. There is no cure for myeloma. Still, this is a hopeful time for myeloma patients. There are more treatments today than in the past, and new treatments are being studied.